Instructions

android

Introduction

Creating a project

Form Builder

Adding a Form
          Key Field
          Title

Text Fields
          Plain

          Numeric
          Date
          Time
          Drop-Down
          Radio 
            Check Boxes
          
Media Fields
           Location

           Photo
           Video
           Audio
           barcode

Validation
           Text
           RegEx   
           Double Entry

Form Logic
           Jumps


Linking Forms
           Hierarchy

           Branching

android


Installing EpiCollect+
Loading a Project


Collecting Data

Text Fields
          Plain

          Numeric
          Date
          Time
          Drop-Down
          Radio
             Check Boxes

Media Fields
           Location

           Photo
           Video
           Audio
           barcode

Saving Data

List/Sync data

Maps

Backing up data

Remote Data

Settings

android


Project Website

Map View

Multiple Forms

Downloading Data

android


Introduction

EpiCollect Markup

The Document
           <model>

The Form
           <form>


Text Fields
           <input>

          <select>
           <select1>
          <radio>
Setting defaults

Media Fields
           <location>
           <photo>
           <video>
           <audio>
           <barcode>

Defining keys

Form Logic
           Jumps


Linking Forms
           Hierarchy

           Branching
  
Validating



Viewing data - The map view

 

You can view location data using Google Maps at your project homepage. For any form which contains a 'location' field (see Form Builder) on clicking 'view all data' a MAP tab is available within which to display all entries.

For our demo Schools project, containing three entries, when clicking the Map tab the following view is displayed:

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By default, the map view displays all points and the bounding box of the map is zoomed in to display all points within one view. A number of sections are shown within the map view, as follows:

 

1 List Entries Contains a list of all entries collected - the 'title' field(s) are displayed here (see section on 'title' in the FormBuilder documentation
2 Map A Google Map, zoomed in to show only those entries represented. Map pins are coloured based on the first choice based field in the form, or the keyfieldif none available.
3 Filter by Time Allows to display only those points within a particular time range by dragging the controls on the left and right. The date of the earliest and latest entries are used to set the range
4 Filter by Field Allows you to filter points displayed based on a value in any of the fields collected. once filtered, a 'clear filter' option is available.
5 Colour by Field Allows you to colour the map pins based on any choice-based field (ie dropdown list or radio buttons)
6 Adding Charts Allows you to chart data fields (see below)

These options allow you a flexible method of displaying all or subsets of your data within the map view. As with EpiCollect, the map view within EpiCollect+ also allows you to view data as graphs (Pie or bar)

 

Viewing entry details

Within the list entries section (1 above) you can click any title to open up an info window containing the full details for that entry. The standard google map controls let you zoom in and out and navigate around the map. The following screenshot shows a zoomed in view for the school titled 'Hogwarts'

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Charting data

Any field you have defined within a project which is not free text or media and within which a user has to make a choice (ie drop-downs, radio or checkboxes) can be charted in one of two ways - as a pie chart or as a bar chart.

We provide the ability for you to display up to three charts on a page. To do so, on the right hand side of the map, click the '<' at the top right of the firct chartbox. This presents the option to choose a field to chart and to specify a chart type. Only chartable fields are offered as options and clicking 'Draw Chart' will display the chart. As follows:

 

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As mentioned, you can have up to three charts displayed at once and, if your data prove very cluttered on a chart, you can change the width of the chart view.

 

Clustering points

A map view such as shown for our demo schools project is fine as there are a small number of points and all can be displayed easily. However, for projects where there are a large number of entries, we provide a clustering methods which is aimed at providing an easier overview of large numbers of points and becomes apparent when zooming out.

If we zoom out so that, for example, the whole of the UK is displayed on the map, the points focussed around London are clustered into one point, displaying, the number of entries, and also a 'halo pie chart' around the point indicated the number of entries of each type (in this case girls or mixed schools) within that cluster. This is shown in the following screenshot:

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As you can see, our three points are now clustered into one, and the halo around the point indicates the proportion of points which have been entered as either of the fields indicated in the key.

This clustering method proves particularly useful when viewing large amounts of data over larger geographical areas. For example, the following screenshot is for a project undertaken in Kenya and contains a larger number of points (roughly 2000):

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Clustering is based on the zoom level chosen when viewing Google Maps and zooming in produces smaller clusters until individual points can be seen. Similarly, zooming out lusters larger numbers of point for ease of viewing and interpretation.

We will now move on to show viewing a multiple form project such as that details in our Schools2 project

Next | Viewing multiple form projects